Tags: gravity

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  1. 4-036-S-AltitudeDependentGravity

    22 Jan 2022 | | Contributor(s):: Jakob Kotas

    Basic projectile motion without air resistance typically assumes gravity is constant. In reality, the acceleration due to gravity is proportional to the inverse-square of the distance between the centers of mass of the Earth and the projectile. When projectiles are near to Earth's surface,...

  2. 3-015-S-StyrofoamBallFall

    24 Mar 2020 | | Contributor(s):: Brian Winkel

    We are given data on a falling Styrofoam ball and we seek to model this motion.

  3. 3-130-S-MatterOfSomeGravity

    07 Aug 2019 | | Contributor(s):: Kurt Bryan

    This project introduces the concept of an inverse problem (or parameter estimation), in the context of the simple linearized pendulum ordinary differential equation. The theme of the project is that one often has a physical model for a system but in which the model contains unknown parameters or...

  4. 2017-Groetsch, C. W. - Hammer and Feather:  Some Calculus of Mass and Fall Time

    09 Sep 2017 | | Contributor(s):: Brian Winkel

    Groetsch, C. W. 2017. Hammer and Feather:  Some Calculus of Mass and Fall Time. Mathematics Magazine. 90: 3-7.See https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.4169/math.mag.90.1.3 .The paper opens this way,“Does a heavy object fall faster than a lighter one? In 1971 NASA...

  5. 3-019-S-ShuttlecockFall

    30 May 2015 | | Contributor(s):: Brian Winkel

    We are given data on the time and position of a shuttlecock as it falls to the ground from a set height. We attempt to model the falling object and we confront the different resistance terms and models. Finally, we introduce a new way of comparing models, the Akaike Information Criterion, and...

  6. 3-013-S-WhiffleBallFall

    30 May 2015 | | Contributor(s):: Brian Winkel

    We are given data on the time and position of a whiffle ball as it falls to the ground. We attempt to model the falling ball and we confront the different resistance terms and models. Finally, we introduce a new way of comparing models, the Akaike Information Criterion, and apply it to our models.